What makes Eco Movers eco-friendly?

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Eco Movers, the city of Seattle and University of Washington teamed up to plant trees around the city. The crew delivered supplies crucial to sustaining young trees.

Over the 10 years we’ve been around, Eco Movers has taken part in quite a few efforts to make a real-world impact on the environment. The company was founded with the goal of reducing waste — it’s endemic in the moving business — and changing the industry standards when it comes to earth-friendly practices.

We kinda set the bar high, but we’ve come a long way toward accomplishing those goals.

Customers have jumped on the bandwagon since 2015, when we started offering reusable packing supplies on a grand scale. This spring, we made some changes to the pricing structure on Eco Boxes and dramatically increased our supply, and cut out our cardboard use almost entirely.

Get this: Even though summer is our busy season, we only used 54 cardboard boxes between July and August combined. We’re on pace to save nearly 16,000 cardboard boxes this year alone.

And while saving cardboard is great, we didn’t think that was enough. Why not actually put trees in the ground?

So we did.

In October, we worked with the city of Seattle and University of Washington on the Trees for Neighborhoods program. The city provides free trees to residents for their yards and along neighborhood streets, but new trees need good nutrients and water. We delivered nutrients (mulch) and bags to slowly release water for the young trees from UW’s horticulture center to the pickup site in SODO.

Lou Stubecki, the Trees for Seattle Program Manager, was thrilled to have the partnership finally come to fruition.

“Because of your assistance, our program participants will be able to mulch and water their new trees for more successful establishment,” he told us. “This in turn will bring about greater tree canopy cover in Seattle.”

That feels good. Sure, it looks good on our resume, but it feels good to see the results of our efforts actually growing in yards across the city.

Want to plant a tree in 2020? You can sign up to be notified when applications open.

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